Mark Hansen

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Smart Nora Pillow Insert Review

Review of: Smart Nora

Used for: Stopping snoring

 

Summary:
The Smart Nora is a revolution in snoring knowledge. Using unique vibration technology, this great product stimulates the muscles of the throat in such way that it increases relaxation, enhances normal breathing, and stops snoring in its tracks. A great option for anyone who suffers from snoring in any way, shape, or form.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Many people don’t realise it, but sleep is one of the most important things that you can provide your body. Poor sleep has been linked weight gain and an associated difficulty losing fat mass, a heightened risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, an increase in mental health issues, all in conjunction with global declines in health.

To put it mildly, sleep is damn important.

And there is nothing more disrupting to sleep than snoring.

Snoring can lead to wakefulness throughout the night, an inability to fall asleep, and even difficulty breathing during sleep – all of which lead to subsequent declines in sleep quality and health.

In fact, people who snore have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing sleep apnea [1], heart disease [2], gastrointestinal issues [3], depression and anxiety [4], cognitive dysfunction [5], weight gain [6], and even a lower libido [7].

But fortunately for us, snoring is not a death sentence.

Enter the Smart Nora.

How Does the Smart Nora Work?

The Smart Nora is a bit of a revolution in terms of snoring related products. It is the first of its kind, and really does approach the correction of snoring from a brand-new perspective!

You see, the Smart Nora essentially a small inflatable pillow that slides just under your normal pillow, around throat height – however, it acts as a whole lot more than ‘just a pillow’. The Smart Nora pillow is attached to a unique sensor that picks up the sound of you snoring. 

As soon as you snore loud enough to be detected by the human ear, the sensor is activated, where it then proceeds to stimulate the pillow. The pillow then undergoes extremely gentle movements to stimulate the muscles of the throat, opening the airways and allowing natural breathing to resume, thus stopping you from snoring.

Pretty amazing, right?

It is important to note that while the vibration and movement that the pillow undergoes is enough to stimulate the muscles of the throat, you can barely feel it – meaning that it will not wake you up or affect your quality of sleep in any manner!

Is the Smart Nora Easy to Use?

The Smart Nora comes with a thorough set of instructions that explain how to use the product in an extremely straightforward way – although I must admit, that even without the instructions you could work out how to use this simple but effective product.

You simply slide the insert into your pillow case, under your pillow, and place the sensor somewhere close to you. A bedside table is perfect, while even on the ground next to your bed will also do the trick.

After that, simply plug it into the wall, and go to sleep!

Due to the unique nature of the product, it doesn’t matter whether you sleep on your side, back, or front – the stimulation will still be effective!

Who is the Smart Nora for?

To be completely honest, the Smart Nora is suitable for absolutely anyone who suffers from snoring. Due to its gentle action, it is unlikely to wake even the lightest of sleepers. Moreover, it doesn’t rely on any chemicals or supplements to promote enhance sleep quality, meaning that it doesn’t elicit any side effects.

It can really be used in any snoring situation!

Who Should Not Use the Smart Nora?

Building on the above point slightly, the Smart Nora appears to be the perfect option for literally anyone who suffers from snoring on the regular. However, it is highly unlikely to cause global improvements in sleep quality in those who do not suffer from snoring.

So, if you are looking for a product to enhance your quality of sleep but don’t snore, then this is definitely not for you.

Is the Smart Nora Effective?

Now while I am not a snorer, I have the rather unpleasant experience of sleeping next to one every couple of nights.

My partner has snored consistently ever since he was a child (something that he blames on puberty… which doesn’t make much sense if you ask me). While it isn’t always terrible, it can make it challenging for me to go to sleep, and it often results in him waking up spontaneously throughout the night – which obviously impacts his quality of sleep in a rather negative manner.

In my mind, he was the perfect guinea pig!

I had dinner at his place, and then went in and set up the Smart Nora on his side of the bed. We ended up hopping into bed at around 10.00pm, which is pretty normal for us.  Now what normally happens from here is he falls asleep as soon as his head hits the pillow, and I’m stuck tightly closing my eyes while trying to ignore the grating noise of his snoring right next to me.

But that didn’t happen last night.

He started snoring after lying there for a bout 5 minutes, and I heard the smallest vibration sound coming from the pillow – and the snoring stopped.

It was actually a little weird.

I deliberately stayed awake for a little longer waiting to hear the process happen again, which it did another two times over the next 45 minutes or so – pretty cool really!

While the vibration noise may irritate some people, it is much better then the snoring itself – in fact I could only really hear it when I focused on it. So, in my mind, the Smart Nora did its job extremely effectively,

As a bonus, my partner woke up feeling more refreshed than he had in weeks, also suggesting that he experienced a deeper and less restless sleep as a result.

Conclusion

The Smart Nora is a great product that can stop snoring and improve sleep quality easily and efficiently. Moreover, considering that it can be applied to any individual and any sleeping position, it is a great natural treatment for literally anyone who experiences snoring.

So, give it a go and get back to us – we would absolutely love to hear how you went with it!

Magnesium and Health: The Ultimate Guide

When people hear the word magnesium they tend to think of the popular element used in the preparation of alloys and compounds. Interestingly, magnesium is also critical to the maintenance of normal health and function.

You see, while magnesium is a considered a micronutrient, and constitutes a mere 0.05% of your body weight, it is actually involved in a number of physiological processes within the body that are integral to its ability to function on a daily basis. With this in mind, in the ideal world your blood magnesium levels should sit between 0.75 and 0.95mmol/L, with an abundance also being stored in your bone and muscle tissue.

Now I can appreciate that these numbers may seem small. In fact, you might find it hard to believe that a compound found in such small amounts within your body can impact your health in such a big way.

But when it comes to this ‘Master Mineral’, that’s exactly the truth.

In a traditional sense, magnesium was thought to play a role in gastrointestinal health, and therefore its supplementation was often recommended to help treat both constipation and indigestion. But recent research has shown that magnesium is actually capable and responsible for much more than this in the human body.

In fact, magnesium manages to accomplish more than most of the other nutrients within our body combined.

 

Building on this a little further, recent research has shown that magnesium is essential for regulating calcium, potassium, and vitamin D levels, which can have implications for bone health [1]. It has also been shown to play a key role in regulating heart functions (with any disruptions in its concentrations significantly increasing your risk of heart attack)

[2].Additionally, magnesium has also been shown to act as a muscle relaxant where it can reduce cramping [3], and is also crucial for normal kidney [4] and brain function [5].

So yeah, it’s kind of important…

As a result, we cannot afford to ignore a magnesium deficiency within the body (as they can cause absolute chaos, wreaking havoc with your health).

Unfortunately, the only source where we tend to obtain magnesium is our diet – and that isn’t a reliable option anymore. You see, through the use of pesticides, fertilizers, and other modern farming techniques, the world has seen a collective decline in soil quality, which has resulted in foods containing less magnesium than they once did.

Amazingly, as a result, most of the words population are actually deficient in magnesium (and have absolutely no idea).

Now you might be wondering how you can find out if you have a magnesium deficiency, and the answer is pretty simple – pay attention to your body. Your body shows pretty significant symptoms when experiencing a magnesium deficiency.

Causes of Low Magnesium Levels

Before we delve into the signs and symptoms of a magnesium deficiency, its important to touch on what can cause a deficiency.

Frequent use of antibiotics, cyclosporine, laxatives, phenytoin, diuretics, digoxin, and insulin can all reduce your magnesium levels in a big way. As a result, people using these sorts of treatments for a long time should certainly monitor their magnesium levels closely.

Additionally, as your body absorbs magnesium through your gut, any disruptions in your digestive system such as irritable bowels, viral or bacterial infections, diarrhea and vomiting, and ulcerative colitis, could all also lead to momentary magnesium loss from your body.

Some further factors that tend to result in magnesium deficiency are certain diseases such as pancreatitis, type-2 diabetes, and hyperthyroidism, and excessive consumption of carbonated drinks, coffee, alcohol, and salt.

In fact, a malfunctioning kidney, prolonged stress, heavy menstrual bleeding, and excessive perspiration could lower your magnesium levels as well.

So, the take home message here? Magnesium deficiency could have number of potential causes.

Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency

Now, in a medical sense, your doctor will not diagnose you with a magnesium deficiency (also known as hypomagnesaemia) unless your blood magnesium levels are lower than 0.75mmol/L.

However, as most of your magnesium (about 99%, in fact) is stored in your bone and muscle tissue, this may not give you a true representation of how much magnesium is within the body. As a result, it is integral that you pay attention to the symptoms that your body may be expressing.

These symptoms include:

Muscle Spasms

Magnesium is a vital component of your muscle tissue, where it helps keep them strong and functioning well [3].

With this in mind, if you suffer from frequent muscle spasms, there is a high chance that they are caused by some degree of magnesium deficiency. Low magnesium levels can bring about a spasm in your muscles with the slightest tension, such as from sneezing, prolonged standing, or over-stretching to reach out for an object.

It is also common for these spasms to occur in the middle of the night, compelling the sufferer to stand or walk in order to get rid of them.

Abnormal Heart Rhythms

Magnesium works synergistically with another key mineral in calcium to help your heart beat rhythmically, while also ensuring the health and function of the muscle tissue that physically makes up the heart.

With this in mind, insufficient magnesium levels cause disruptions in this heart rhythm [6].

This actually explains why intravenous magnesium is one of the most commonly used treatments for atrial fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias. So, if you experience a flutter in your chest or miss a heartbeat often, you may very well have an arrhythmia or abnormal heart rhythm caused by low magnesium levels.

Depression

There is an abundance of research suggesting that magnesium deficiency can cause brain damage and neurological dysfunction, leading to depression and altered mood. This also explains why magnesium supplementation is also recommended as an additional treatment for people suffering depression and anxiety [7].

Taking this into consideration, if you find yourself feeling down regularly, then it may be a sign and symptom of a key magnesium deficiency.

Migraines

As magnesium plays a key role in the production of various neurotransmitters and the health of the cardiovascular system, it promotes healthy blood flow to the brain. As a result, it has been shown that individuals who suffer from frequent bouts of migraines often have lower levels of magnesium in their blood and tissues [8].

As a result, deficient magnesium levels are highly likely to increase the frequency that you experience headaches.

Other Symptoms

And finally, while the above 4 symptoms are the most well supported, there are some others that may occur during times of magnesium deficiency.

These may include a loss of appetite, general muscle weakness or fatigue, excessive nausea and vomiting, unexplained tremors, high blood pressure, personality changes, mental confusion, and poor memory.

Some experts also believe that restless leg syndrome could be a result of low magnesium levels.

What should you eat to improve your magnesium levels?

Now, we previously mentioned that our key source of magnesium’s actually comes form the food that we eat.

Unfortunately, the type of foods we eat in the western world today are not all that conducive towards maintaining optimal magnesium levels. As a result, most people hardly manage to fulfil their body’s magnesium requirements through their diet.

The recommended daily allowance of Magnesium for adults above 18 years of age is 400-420 mg for males and 310-320 mg for women.

However, these levels generally vary depending on various factors such as pregnancy, lactation, age, underlying medical illnesses, etc. Even if you manage to meet these requirements, other factors such as alcohol, soda, coffee, and salt in your diet, or gastro-intestinal disorders are probably making it difficult for your body to absorb all of this magnesium.

So, what should you eat and how much of it should you eat to give your body enough magnesium?

Here’s a table of foods rich in dietary magnesium and their exact magnesium content to help you make some informed decisions.

FoodMagnesium content/ serving
Almonds, 1 ounce dry and roasted80
Spinach, ½ a cup boiled78
Cashews, 1 ounce, roasted74
Peanuts, ¼ cup roasted63
Soymilk, 1 cup61
Whole wheat bread, 2 slices46
Avocado, 1 cup44
Low fat Yoghurt, plain, 8 ounces42
Brown rice, cooked, ½ cup42
Breakfast cereals, fortified with magnesium40

How Can You Correct or Prevent Magnesium Deficiencies?

If you have a magnesium deficiency (or happen to fall into one of the high-risk groups likely to develop a deficiency) or find yourself suffering from any of the symptoms mentioned above, then you probably need to supplement with magnesium as well as increase the amount of magnesium-rich foods in your.

Even if your doctor has been unable to determine the cause of your symptoms and discomfort (and the enumerable blood exams you have had to undergo have all come back with normal results), there’s still a genuine chance that magnesium is the one creating all of this havoc.

Now the key here is to find a quality magnesium supplement that works, and works well.

The Best Magnesium Supplement Product Reviews

Taking this into consideration, we wanted to give you some great options that you can implement into your diet immediately. Each of these offer a great option in their own right, in which they make up what we believe to be the best three magnesium supplement available on the market.

Doctors Best High Absorption Magnesium Supplement

This magnesium supplement by Doctors Best is hands down the most popular on the market at the moment, where a huge number of consumers have applauded its effectiveness.

 

This particular option provides a solid dosage of 200mg per serve, making ideal for those individuals who already obtain a bit of magnesium from their diet, and simply need that extra boost.

NOW 400mg Magnesium Supplement

NOW have been a favourite of ours for a long time, ultimately due to their ability to consistently produce great quality supplements with scientific evidence to support their use, at extremely affordable price points – and their magnesium supplement is no different.

 

Providing a highly potent dosage of 400mg per serve, this supplement ensures you cover all your bases by meeting the daily requirements in a single dosage. And as a bonus, this is also one of the more affordable options on the market, making it perfect for those on a budget.

Nature Made High Potency Magnesium Supplement

Our final option be Nature Made has been extremely well received from those within the health industry, with people applauding its effectiveness.

 

Similar to our previous option by NOW, this supplement provides a highly potent dosage of 400mg per serve – you really can’t go wrong here.

Conclusions

When it comes to magnesium, it’s in your best interest to absolutely ensure you have enough available with your body. With it demonstrating links to heart and bone health, muscle and brain function, and mood and depression, it truly is one of the most important minerals within the entire body.

If you have had any experience with magnesium deficiency or magnesium supplementation then we would love to hear about it – so, please drop us a comment and we will get back to you ASAP.

“I Can’t Sleep!” Take This 60 Second Test & Get to Sleep Faster

“I Can’t Sleep!” Take This 60 Second Test & Get to Sleep Faster

Take the 60-second Sleep Test Now:

Is Your Number 10 or Higher? Don’t panic just yet – here’s what you can do to get to sleep faster right now:

Get your breathing down to 6 breaths per minute. That’s the range that triggers your body’s baroreflex to calm you down and reduce the mental noise in your head.

4-7-8 Breathing

This is a technique stemming from yoga traditions and shared by Dr. Andrew Weil, a leader in the holistic health and integrated medicine field for over three decades.

For 4-7-8 breathing, breathe in through your nose for four seconds, hold your breath for seven, and exhale through your mouth (Dr. Weil suggests exhaling loudly) for eight. Repeat this four times, he says, and you’ll be relaxed enough to sleep.

In the video below, he gives you a step-by-step guide for how to do this technique properly. While there’s limited scientific research on the method to either support or refute it, various, similar breathing techniques have been used for over two thousand years in yogic and meditative practices for either to relax or energize, depending on the method. More recently, a 2011 study in Health Science Journal identified potential health and relaxation benefits of deep breathing exercises, particularly from the diaphragm.

One of the best things about this technique? Unlike traditional insomnia medications or sleeping pills that face users with issues of increased tolerance, 4-7-8 breathing is said to get more effective over time, and when done for six weeks, can positively impact heart rate variability, an indicator for reduced stress, improved cognition, and decreased anxiety, according to this 2013 study on pranayamic breathing.

The 4-7-8 method may be a boon for getting you some needed relaxation, if no shut eye, but insomnia can be an indicator of broader health issues.

Is This Difficult for YOU?

A lot of people find it difficult to do this type of breathing (or any meditative type of exercise) very hard to do for any length of time. If that’s you, then there’s a relatively cheap sleep tech gadget that helps you do this without much effort at all.

Is the Inability to Sleep Rare for You, or Is It Becoming a Habit?

How do you know when it’s gone from just a few sleepless nights to full-on insomnia? It turns out, the answer can sneak up on you. According to Dr. Susan Biali Haas, wellness expert and former insomniac herself who attended a talk on insomnia from Eric Zhou, Ph.D of Harvard’s Division of Sleep Medicine, insomnia is classified as when you’ve been “dissatisfied with the quality of your sleep for three or more nights a week, for more than three months.” Sound like you?

Risk Factors for Insomnia

If so, first examine any underlying causes of your insomnia. There are a multitude of risk factors:

Stress

In U.S. society, and most of the digitally-steeped world, stress plays a factor in our day-to-day lives. If left unchecked, stress can run away with your downtime. If you find yourself fretting about money, health, your family, or work, even in your alone time, brushing your teeth, or as you lay down for sleep, then stress could be playing a key role in your struggles with insomnia.

Erratic Work or Travel Schedules

Shift work is often an unavoidable evil. Bills have to get paid, mouths need to get fed, and often a night shift or rotating grocery store shifts can seem like the only way to make ends meet. Maybe you even enjoy the job you have, but the rotating shifts or late schedule could be a primary cause of your insomnia.

Even if you work a more stable nine to five, business trips and long commutes can contribute to your erratic sleep schedule, keeping you from establishing a routine that signals to your body when it’s time to start getting to bed.

A Night Routine That Doesn’t Prioritize Sleep

Sometimes, it’s not an ever-changing schedule or work travel that disrupts your sleep, but your relationship to your evening routine itself. Often, we push back our time to get ready for bed until the last minute, eager to stay up and watch just one more episode, play one more card game, or have another glass of wine with your partner.

However, if these activities push well into the night, leaving you flipping off the bedside lamp with the glow of a TV screen still running, you could very well be negatively impacting your sleep without realizing it. The blue light of screens interferes with your brain’s ability to tune into a restful energy.

According to a study from Harvard, blue light suppresses the body’s ability to produce melatonin, the hormone that syncs us to our circadian rhythms – more on that later.

Erratic Work or Travel Schedules

Shift work is often an unavoidable evil. Bills have to get paid, mouths need to get fed, and often a night shift or rotating grocery store shifts can seem like the only way to make ends meet. Maybe you even enjoy the job you have, but the rotating shifts or late schedule could be a primary cause of your insomnia.

Even if you work a more stable nine to five, business trips and long commutes can contribute to your erratic sleep schedule, keeping you from establishing a routine that signals to your body when it’s time to start getting to bed.

A Night Routine That Doesn’t Prioritize Sleep

Sometimes, it’s not an ever-changing schedule or work travel that disrupts your sleep, but your relationship to your evening routine itself. Often, we push back our time to get ready for bed until the last minute, eager to stay up and watch just one more episode, play one more card game, or have another glass of wine with your partner.

However, if these activities push well into the night, leaving you flipping off the bedside lamp with the glow of a TV screen still running, you could very well be negatively impacting your sleep without realizing it. The blue light of screens interferes with your brain’s ability to tune into a restful energy.

According to a study from Harvard, blue light suppresses the body’s ability to produce melatonin, the hormone that syncs us to our circadian rhythms – more on that later.

Caffeine 

It seems like everyone in the U.S. is addicted to caffeine. When someone even utters “I don’t do caffeine,” heads turn to judge the person who’s somehow avoided our collective addiction.

Because of this, it may seem like too much fo a change, or too stressful, to cut out caffeine altogether. But to get a good night’s rest, you should be cutting down your intake and setting a hard limit for caffeinated beverages.

Be sure to double-check your drinks for caffeine past a certain limit – things like kombucha (and other probiotic beverages) contain caffeine that could be just enough to keep you from getting the sleep you need. If caffeine’s a habit you can’t seem to kick, be sure to quit drinking it by the afternoon, with at least six hours between your last cup of joe and your bedtime.

Nicotine 

Nicotine has persisted as a drug of choice worldwide for the same reason caffeine has: its efficacy as a stimulant. Dieters often turn to nicotine too, citing its appetite-suppressing qualities as a justification for the negative side effects it unleashes on users, one of those being insomnia.

When a stimulant like nicotine is coursing through your body, it can be hard to fall asleep and stay asleep, especially as withdrawal symptoms kick in by morning and the urge for another cigarette disrupts the tail end of your sleep.

Alcohol

Although the nightcap is a standard for some, it turns out, alcohol does not help you get a good night’s sleep. In 2013, a series of studies were reviewed on alcohol and sleeplessness. The conclusion? While alcohol helps you fall asleep immediately, it disrupts the quality of your REM sleep, which scientists believe is the most restorative cycle.

Drinking before bed can keep your REM cycle from functioning optimally, leading you sluggish and forgetful the next morning. It is worth noting, however, that the study found minimal REM cycle disruption with a standard one to two drinks – so as long as your nightcap is truly just a single nightcap, alcohol is probably not the cause of your poor sleep quality.

If you’ve eliminated those common habit and lifestyle factors and are still reckoning with insomnia, it may be time to consider whether you have a physical or mental condition contributing to your history of sleepless nights:

Medications

According to the Mayo Clinic, as of 2013, roughly 70% of all people in the U.S. take prescription drugs – and more than half take at least two. With these alarming statistics of medications taking the reins in our nation’s health and wellness practices, it’s no surprise that side effects come creeping in and impact our lives – including insomnia. If you’re one of the seven in ten, there are ten common types of medications that can cause insomnia:

1. Alpha blockers

Alpha blockers are commonly prescribed to treat hypertension, as well as Raynaud’s Disease and benign prostatic hyperplasia. While they can increase blood flow and lower blood pressure, they are also known to inhibit the REM cycle, much like excessive alcohol, leaving you drowsy and forgetful the next day.

Like alpha blockers, beta blockers are prescribed to treat hypertension, as well as migraines and glaucoma. However, rather than disrupting the REM cycle, beta blockers work by suppressing the body’s reaction to adrenaline, which can rear its head as you sleep with nightmares and waking up in the middle of the night.

Used for diseases of inflammation like rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and lupus, corticosteroids contribute to sleeplessness (and to inflammation by proxy) by disrupting the body’s adrenal glands and igniting the fight-or-flight response.

SSRIs have played a critical role in mitigating moderate to severe depression for many individuals suffering from the disease, and consequently can help reduce the stress and anxiety depression can cause. However, the fact is that scientists don’t entirely understand how and why SSRIs work, and consequently, they aren’t exactly sure why they can cause insomnia. According to one study in 2011, 81% of participants on SSRIs struggled with insomnia.

5. ACE Inhibitors​​​

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, like many of the drugs on this list, treat high blood pressure. With uncomfortable side effects like a hacking cough, headaches, and throat problems, trouble sleeping isn’t far behind.

Used to treat memory loss in patients with dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease, cholinesterase inhibitors have several side effects that disrupt the quality of aging patients’ lives, including nausea, diarrhea, and insomnia. While these help slow the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease, they cannot stop or reverse it.

7. Glucosamine/Chondroitin

A dietary supplement purported to improve joint health, glucosamine and chondroitin are a common addition to vitamin routines for people with joint problems and arthritis. Similar to SSRIs, scientists aren’t quite sure why glucosamine works, but they have determined that common side effects include insomnia and digestive issues.

Prescribed to treat high cholesterol, statins have dangerous side effects with major implications. The muscle pain they cause has been described as debilitating and guilty of causing insomnia on their own. However, stanins further can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, causing chemical reactions that give patients night terrors and sleeplessness.

Mental Health

If you aren’t on medication but struggle with mental health disorders such as anxiety and depression, you may have trouble falling asleep. Insomnia is a common indicator for depressionanxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Sleep-Specific Disorders

Sleep apnea causes disruptions in your sleep cycle by inhibiting your breathing. This can lead to a range of serious conditions, including chronic insomnia. Less deadly, but just as disruptive to your sleep cycle, are disorders like restless legs syndrome, which typically gets worse around bedtime.

Other Diseases

There are a wide variety of diseases that can cause insomnia, either by being a persistent irritatnt that makes relaxation difficult, or by inhibiting certain chemicals or hormones from helping you fall asleep. Common diseases that lead to insomnia include allergies, gastrointestinal problems, hyperthyroidism, arthritis, asthma, neurological conditions like Parkinson’s, chronic pain, endometriosiscancer, and diabetes.

If any of these lifestyle factors, medications, or diseases sound like you, then it may be time for you to determine whether it’s really insomnia you’re experiencing – and whether environmental triggers are the key.

Diagnosing Insomnia

When Dr. Biali Haas recognized she fit the criteria for insomnia, she didn’t accept it as defeat. Instead, she took charge of her life by starting a sleep log. In her sleep log, Dr. Biali Haas spent two weeks noting:

By logging these things, Dr. Biali Haas was able to identify lifestyle factors that contributed to her insomnia, especially when she started getting ready for bed after eleven. This, she says, links back to our circadian rhythms.

She says that regulating our schedules improves and balances our circadian rhythm, giving us better rest sooner. One thing she recommended was opening the curtains as soon as you wake up, to expose yourself to sunlight and regulate your schedule from the get-go.

Fighting Insomnia With a Better Sleep Environment and Routine

If you try a sleep log and still encounter sleeplessness, look at the other aspects of your sleep routine: limit alcohol to one or two drink servings, use blue-blocking glasses if you absolutely must look at screens at night, eat earlier – or stop snacking as late, and curb stimulating activity sooner rather than later. See our “Why Can’t I Sleep?” article for the full list of potential sleep improvement tactics.

Dr. Weil’s recommendation of the 4-7-8 breathing technique can also effectively help you relax, stowing away anxieties or worries to face head-on the next morning, supported by a good night’s sleep.

Research has also suggested that you should leave the bed ten minutes after you start having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep; this is because the brain is wonderfully elastic, and begins to associate your bed with sleeplessness. Instead, go to the couch and listen to music, read a book, meditate, or do crossword puzzles. When you feel tired, try heading back to bed and getting some quality shuteye.

Using Insomnia Supplements and Medication Wisely

Only after trying all of these lifestyle adjustments for several weeks with no results should you try supplements or medication. As was described above, many medications can have disastrous side effects, and insomnia medications are no different.

When you use a sleeping pill, use them sparingly and only when you must. If you or your family have a history of addiction, opt for natural sleeping remedies like this tincture from Wishgarden, or any supplement containing chamomile, valerian rootskullcap, or St. John’s Wort.

When to See a Doctor About Insomnia

If none of these lifestyle adjustments or herbal remedies have provided you with relief, it may be time to consult your doctor about insomnia treatment. Don’t hesitate to find help.

Bad sleep means more than a rough night. You deserve to feel energized and enthusiastic for each day. Insomnia doesn’t have to rule your life; start today by trying the sleep log. Let us know how it goes in the comments below!

Trouble Sleeping? This Fast-Acting Fix Is Proven to Work

There’s hardly anything more frustrating than lying awake for hours in the middle of the night when all you want is to sleep.

Getting enough sleep is critical to your overall health. According to the National Institutes of Health, inadequate sleep is associated with:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Relationship problems
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity

If that weren’t bad enough, people who don’t get enough sleep have eye-hand coordination that is as bad or worse than people who are intoxicated. This leads to thousands of car crashes every year. Some of which are fatal.

For Many, There’s a Simple Solution

Many people suffer from a simple problem that prevents them from falling asleep. To see if this is true for YOU, take the quick test below by playing the video and following the instructions. It takes less than one minute total.

Is Your Number 10 or Higher?

If it is, you may be in luck because the solution to your insomnia may be simple. You need to get your breathing down to 6 breaths per minute. That’s the range that triggers your body’s baroreflex to calm you down and reduce the mental noise in your head.

Deep breathing techniques have been used for over two thousand years in yoga and meditation practices to relax the body and mind. More recently, a 2011 study in Health Science Journal identified potential health and relaxation benefits of deep breathing exercises, particularly from the diaphragm.

Best of All, No Pills

One of the best things about this technique? Unlike traditional insomnia medications or sleeping pills that can cause dependency, deep breathing is said to get more effective over time. 

When done for six weeks, it can positively impact heart rate variability, an indicator for reduced stress, improved cognition, and decreased anxiety, according to a 2013 study on pranayamic breathing.

By far, easiest way take advantage of deep, slow breathing at just the right pace–and without having to think about it or even count breaths–is to use this affordable and effective sleep tech gadget.

So slow down your breathing and get ready for a night of peaceful, healthy and rejuvenating rest.

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